Andato a Pescare

  • Text: Theo Mohamed
  • Styling: Theo Mohamed
  • Photography: Luis Valdizon
  • Model: Aaron Pharness
  • Inspired by the spirit of the fisherman, Federico Curradi’s latest collection is emblematic of the fleeting beauty of the natural world.

    Where arterial water flow meets a mass reservoir, at the Bocca d’Arno, there lies a collection of rickety, ancient looking fishing huts. Stilted structures of wood and metal, these shacks represent a life of independence and providence. The humble fisherman sits with rod in hand, waiting patiently for the fateful moment where an unsuspecting aquatic creature is hooked upon his line. This life of self sufficiency at the water’s edge requires uninhibiting garments that allow for total corporeal ability; the fisherman must move freely betwixt the water and solid ground.


    Federico Curradi, a young Roberto Cavalli alum, used the archetype of the piscator to inspire his Spring Summer 2019 collection. The garments of the collection are cut to be roomy, keeping in mind the practical necessities of the fisherman in his daily life. The textiles, however: heavy silk twills, and cashmere blended gauzes, though beautiful, are selected by wholly separate standards. What Curradi provides in lieu of hardy rigidity, is a distinctly Florencian softness that brings lightness to a trade of hard work.

    The hand finishing and embellishment seen throughout the collection is emblematic of the fisherman’s resign to a life of servitude. Great care is taken with each cast as with each stitch. Soft faded hues, ripped from the ramshackle structures that line the mouth of the Arno river, graced the assembly of handmade items evoking a sense of summer ephemerality. Curradi’s obsessive approach makes for garments that become objects of beauty and transcend the idea of clothing. The soft garment dyeing seen throughout provides a sense of age, connecting back to the fisherman whose waders and tattered shirt have kept him protected for decades.


    Curradi is also distinctly mindful of nature in his approach to design. In each of his collections, Federico employs only biodegradable, sustainably sourced materials in an effort to reduce his impact. Sourcing, cutting, construction, and finishing, are all conducted some miles from Federico’s home in Florence, making for a low impact manufacturing process. The designer, who has said he often prefers the company of animals to humans, emblazons each tag on his clothing with the phrase “Feed the good wolf.” This statement is one that needs to be considered across society. The plague of mediocrity that is sweeping the world does not compel humanity to seek out excellence. Curradi is an example of a man whose effort should not go unnoticed. Change only comes with action and Curradi is pushing sartorialism to act for those that excel.

  • Text: Theo Mohamed
  • Styling: Theo Mohamed
  • Photography: Luis Valdizon
  • Model: Aaron Pharness